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   Sarah Harris, a Tennessee Tech senior in ag business from Memphis, and Grace Woodard, a recent Tech graduate in agriculture from Tullahoma, look over some of the tomatoes growing in an urban garden at Northside Community Center in Cookeville.   A collaboration between Tennessee Tech, Seed…

I know I am not the sharpest pencil in the drawer, or the brightest bulb on the porch, and a few bricks shy of a load. However, my philosophy is simple, if you know what you are not, then you can soon figure out what you really are.

SAS welcomes new faculty and staff. Back Row (Left to Right): John Wheeler, Cheryl MacPherson, Thomas Priestley, Melissa Askins, Anna Palmer, Neal Johnson, Dan Monahan, J.R. Ankney, Marcus Murphy; Front Row: Christine Monahan, Katherine Mulloy, Kira Tharp, Kimberly Perkins, Amanda Skrezeczko…

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LYNCHBURG, TN (Aug. 8, 2018) – Parker Hildreth, a recent Motlow graduate from Smithville, knows what makes him “tick” when it comes to his passion for the world of nature. Whether it is studying crayfish in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, or researching salmon in the rugged wilderne…

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 Tigers Don't Leave Tracks! - aimed at educating students about sustainability and helping them reduce their use of single-use plastics - is beginning a new year at Sewanee Elementary. Thanks to your support, and to an award from Good Sports Always RecycleTM, Sewanee Elementary now has a cus…

What is fat-shaming? Humiliating, discriminating, and judging a person based on her/his body weight. Weightism is a prejudice in our culture. “The shaming may be performed under the guise of helping the person who is overweight/obese to realize they need to lose weight or they will die, beco…

Tennessee Tech students (from left) Darsh Dinger, Ryan Colon, Nathan Daniel, Seth Logue, Nathan Krupla and Wesley Kizer submitted a proposal and were selected to be one of 25 Micro-g Neutral Buoyancy Experiment Design Teams in the nation.

Headline Stress Disorder: When breaking news is bad for your health (Healthline) Like many of her friends, Charlene Jaszewski, a freelance editor living in Portland, Oregon, grabs her phone the minute she wakes up to see "what fresh hell happened" overnight. One morning, the self-professed "digital nomad" was on her way to a coffee shop to do some work when she had what she calls "a little breakdown" in her car. She had been arguing politics that morning with people she (strongly) disagreed with, and suddenly started crying. "I felt angry and helpless at the same time," she recalled, though she wasn't sure exactly why she was being so affected. Glenn Garber, a retired city planner living in a small town outside Boston, says he quickly turns on CNN or MSNBC or NPR when he wakes up in the morning. "Even though I know there's going to be news that make me crazy, I can't seem to break the habit," he explained. "It's a low-grade nervousness that affects me every waking hour, and I know so many people who feel the same way." It affects people across the political spectrum While headline stress disorder may sound like a euphemism for "I don't like the current president and his policies," a version of it does cross the aisles. According to a Pew Research Center survey released in early June, close to 7 in 10 Americans said they felt "worn out by the amount of news" that's available. Republicans and right-leaning Americans, in fact, reported feeling being overwhelmed by news: three quarters of Republicans versus 6 in 10 Democrats. Since 2006, the American Psychological Association (APA) has regularly surveyed Americans on stress, generally finding that money, work, and the economy were "very" or "somewhat significant" sources of stress. For the first 10 years, the surveys found stress levels were decreasing, according to "Stress in America: Coping With Change." But in the latter half of 2016 and in early 2017, that trend began to change direction. Read More

Headline Stress Disorder: When breaking news is bad for your health